Microbeads and Toothpaste

There has been much talk in the news recently about “microbeads” and how some organisations, such as Greenpeace, are campaigning and petitioning the Prime Minister to ban the unnecessary use of these plastics in our cosmetics.

They slip down the plug hole and end up in our oceans, polluting the waters and ending up in the stomachs of sea birds, fish, whales and other marine life.

As the public become more aware of this, at Absolute Dental we are being more frequently asked to recommend toothpastes that do NOT contain microbeads, and so we thought we would share the information with all of you who read our blog! Please feel free to share these links with anyone else you know who has an interest in preserving our oceans!

Firstly, if you check the “ingredients” for many cosmetics, microbeads are often listed as

Polyethylene

There are now hundreds of cosmetic producers who do NOT use microbeads in their products, toothpaste producers included.

Here is a link for you to click on and find out if your preferred cosmetic provider and toothpaste manufacturer use microbeads. This is a list of all products that currently do NOT contain microbeads – toothpaste manufacturers start on page 26.

http://beatthemicrobead.org/images/pdf/greenUK.pdf

This is what oral care giant Colgate have to say about microbeads:

“Colgate used microbeads in a limited number of oral care and personal care products to enhance aesthetics and aid in cleaning. However, some groups raised concerns regarding the potential contribution of microbeads to pollution of the world’s oceans. Recognizing that consumers have questions, as of year-end 2014 we are no longer using microbeads. More recently, consumer questions have extended beyond microbeads to some polymer-based materials, many of which dissolve in water and biodegrade. Colgate continues to monitor the science and evaluate our use of polymer-based ingredients to ensure continued improvements in the environmental profile of our products”

 

We hope you find this information useful, and if you want to know more about the harmful effects of microbeads, please visit the Greenpeace website.

http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/blog/oceans/what-are-plastic-microbeads-and-why-should-we-ban-them-20160114